Don’t Let it Loose: Be a Responsible Pet Owner
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Plantwise: Alternatives For Your Garden
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Clean, Drain, Dry Your Boat & Equipment
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Buy It Where You Burn It: Don’t Move Firewood
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Play, Clean, Go: Protect Our Outdoors
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  • Don’t Let it Loose: Be a Responsible Pet Owner
  • Plantwise: Alternatives For Your Garden
  • Clean, Drain, Dry Your Boat & Equipment
  • Buy It Where You Burn It: Don’t Move Firewood
  • Play, Clean, Go: Protect Our Outdoors

INVADER OF THE MONTH

  • Flowering rush, also known as grassy rush or water gladiolus, is a cattail-like perennial found in freshwater wetlands. Infestations can reduce water quality and may disrupt valuable fish and wildlife habitat. Once established it can be difficult to remove. Care must be taken to remove all parts of the plant—root fragments can drift with water movement and result in new infestations. All plant matter should be disposed of in landfill-bound garbage.
  • Flowers are 2-2.5 cm wide with twenty to fifty pink through white flowers borne on umbrella shaped clusters. Anthers are red. There are 9 stamens ranged in an inner whorl of 3 and outer whorl of 6. Leaves are green and sword-shaped, originate from base of plant, and are triangular in cross-section, twisted toward the tip, and feel spongy when compressed. Stems are erect and triangular near the base. Plants grow to 150 cm.
  • Flowering rush can grow on water margins or as a submerged plant with flexible leaves suspended in deeper water (3-6 m). It is widely tolerant of soil types (sandy to clay) and soil acidity, but does require wet soil and full sun. It is hardy to Zone 2 in Canada. It is native to Africa, Asia and Europe and was likely introduced to North America as an ornamental plant.
  • It is the only member of the Butomaceae family and is able to reproduce both by seed and vegetatively (rhizomatous roots form bulbits which separate from the parent plant). Plants flower summer to fall. Flowers are hermaphroditic (contain both male & female organs) and are pollinated by bees, flies and butterflies.
  • Do not grow flowering rush. Ask your local nursery about non-invasive alternatives. It spreads by seed or root fragments so care must be taken to remove existing plants. Cutting below the water surface can suppress plants but will need to be repeated with hand digging. Diquat is registered for use on flowering rush in lakes, ponds, irrigation canals and slow moving streams. Herbicide applications near water require applicator certification and permits. Download the fact sheet